Facebook Twitter
Bookmark and Share
National Building Trades Department
Ask ACT Ohio

Important Issues

On Twitter:

What is So Called “RIGHT TO WORK”?

“So Called Right to Work” laws make it optional for workers protected by a union contract to help pay for the expenses that a union incurs while guaranteeing the rights of all employees.

“So Called Right to Work” laws restrict freedom of association by prohibiting workers and employers from agreeing to contracts that include fair share fees, forcing dues-paying union members to subsidize services to non-union employees.

On its surface, a “so called right to work” law prohibits worker security agreements between labor unions and their employers. In reality, the law strips workers of protections afforded by unions.

The laws are allowed under the 1947 federal Taft–Hartley Act.

“Right to Work” is a grossly misleading title, created by its supporters and proponents to put a positive spin on the otherwise damaging statute.

 

“So Called Right to Work” = ATTACK on Middle Class!

“So Called Right to Work” Laws Amount to “Right To Work FOR LESS”

Anti-labor interests attempt to install "so called right to work” laws to further weaken working people – because organized labor is weakened by these laws, so wages are lowered and worker safety and health are endangered.

 

The FACTS About “So Called Right to Work”

FACT:
Wages in “so called right to work” states are at least 3.2% lower than those in other states.

FACT:
The rate of employer-sponsored health insurance is at least 2.6% lower in “so called right to work” states.

FACT:
The rate of employer-sponsored pensions is at least 4.8% lower in “so called right to work” states.

FACT:
The poverty rate is at least 2.3% higher in “so called right to work” states.

  • Federal law already prohibits any American from being forced to join a union.
  • “So called right to work” laws don’t grant any rights, they simply weaken unions.
  • Federal law also prohibits unions from using member or non-member fees to pay for activities that might violate political or religious beliefs of a worker.
  • States without “so called right to work” laws have healthier tax bases.
  • "So called right to work" laws disproportionately harm women. Union women, on average, earn $149 more per week than non-union women.
  • "So called right to work" laws disproportionately harm people of color. Hispanic and Latino union members earn 45 percent more and African-Americans who are in unions see salaries 30 percent higher than African-Americans who are not in unions.
  • "So called right to work" laws undercut unionized businesses in the states where they exist because non-union businesses can offer cheaper goods and services by exploiting their workers.

 

"So Called Right To Work" RESEARCH

Does ‘Right-to-Work’ Create Jobs? Answers from Oklahoma
By Gordon Lafer and Sylvia Allegretto

Just Who is Ohioans for Workplace Freedom?

 Click here to compare drastic wage & benefit differences between Right to Work states and Non-Right to Work states.


The governor cites no labor unrest and good relations between labor and management in Ohio while questioned about "So Called Right to Work" legislation.

 

Gov. Kasich Cool to Right to Work Proposal

April 5th at a press conference Governor John Kasich (R) continued to withhold his support for a “So Called Right to Work” constitutional amendment. Gov. Kasich said that Ohio does not have labor unrest issues and that he makes that clear to those looking to do business in the state.

Gov. Kasich is an unlikely opponent of the "So Called Right to Work" proposal as his remarks come almost a year after he signed Senate Bill 5 into law which severely curtailed the collective bringing rights of public employees in Ohio. SB 5 was later soundly defeated by Ohio voters.

Ohioans for Workplace Freedom an extreme right wing group is currently circulating petitions to place a “So Called Right to Work” constitutional amendment on the ballot. The amendment would severely damage the ability of unions to fairly represent its members in the workplace. ACT Ohio stands categorically opposed to any "So Called Right to Work" proposal in Ohio.

 

Senate Leaders Quickly Halt Latest So-Called Right to Work Effort

Two House Republicans on Wednesday unveiled proposed legislation to make Ohio a So-Called Right to Work State, but GOP leaders in the Senate killed the idea in a matter of hours.

Reps. Ron Maag, R-Lebanon, and Kristina Roegner, R-Hudson, proposed separate bills that together would make it optional for public and private-sector workers protected by a union contract to help pay the expenses that a union incurs while fighting to guarantee the rights of all employees.

Their actions came roughly 16 months after the voters of Ohio overwhelmingly rejected efforts to institute collective bargaining limits on government workers via Senate Bill 5.

But by Wednesday evening, Senate President Keith Faber, R-Celina, issued a statement essentially halting the efforts of Maag and Roegner, at least for now.

“We have an ambitious agenda focused on job creation and economic recovery, and Right to Work legislation is not on that list. After discussions with other leaders and my caucus, I don’t believe there is current support for this issue in the General Assembly,” Faber’s statement read ACT Ohio Secretary Treasurer Dennis Duffey commended Faber for taking quick and decisive action halting a “needless attack on Ohio’s working families.”

“These type of laws have been shown over and over again to do nothing to support economic development,” Duffey added. “ACT Ohio and Ohio State Building Construction Trades Council look forward to working with both parties on real efforts to create meaningful jobs in Ohio that help boost the economy.”

Twenty-four states, including neighboring Michigan and Indiana, have passed so-called right-to-work laws. Supporters often claim the intent is to create a business-friendly environment, but economic studies have struggled to document such benefits.

But data does exist showing salaries are lower, benefits cost more and worker safety decreases in current states where So Called Right to Work laws are in place.

So vigilance must be maintained. There is no doubt the So Called Right to Work efforts will pop up again in the Buckeye State.

While struggling, a petition drive continues to gather signatures to put a so-called right-to-work constitutional amendment on the ballot. Organizers have said if they can’t gather the necessary signatures by this year’s deadline, they will shift focus to 2014.